August 18, 2000 - by

Ahh! The French Riviera

August 18, 2000


Photo Gallery
Seminoles Take Down Troistorrents, 108-79


By sophomore Molly Beal


Arise and shine, Lady Noles, time to fly by the l’avion to the “nice”
place
of Nice, France. Today we were up, dressed, fed and on the bus by 8
a.m. —
the earliest some of us had awoke probably since school has been out.

However, the lack of sleep did not bother any of us, because no one had
been
to the French Riviera before, and we were all eager to put on our bathing
suits and get our fix to the next best thing to the Florida sunshine.
The flight was about an hour long and before we knew it, we had arrived to
sunshine, rocky beaches, lots and lots of ice cream, and how could I not
mention, topless beaches. It was not even 2:00 and we were lying on the
towels and covered lounge chairs that the hotel had provided nearly 20
feet
from the Mediterranean sea. The temperature was around 27 Celsius (which
means hot, hot, hot). As the real “beach bums” layed in the sun together,
others of us got a bite to eat for lunch. Seeing that we did not have a
game today, we all decided that we would have to get our daily adrenaline
rush by other means. So, we thought tubing and para sailing might just do
the trick. Boy, did they!

Beginning with tubing, they took us out in groups of fours. “They”
meaning
these little, skinny, incredibly tan, young Frenchmen who spoke little
English and wore very little as well. As I looked around the beach, I
would shake my head in amazement and then remind myself, yet again, that
is
is another cultural here. Brooke (Wyckoff), Vanessa (Fuchs), our athletic
trainer Kari Langley and I climbed into the big inner tubes and assured
ourselves that in the event we did get hurt, at least we brought Kari
along
to save us. “Hit it,” we yelled, and we were out into the Mediterranean,
holding on for our dear lives, trying not to be the first one thrown off.

I
think we lasted a whole four seconds before someone was ousted from their
tube into the deep, salt water sea, with water going in their mouth and
their neck getting whip lash from the rope of another’s tube. This trend
continued. Soon, we had all taken our turn of wipeouts to which the
Frenchmen responded by holding up big L’s indicating we were losers for
not
being able to hold on, as well as giant bursts of laughter at our rather
humorous tubing expedition. Unfortunately, for half of my group, I began
to
get a little dare-devilish and greedy for a greater thrill. So, I
suggested
to our drivers to “just try” and throw all four of us off all at once.

Indeed, they definitely arose to the challenge and succeeded in throwing,
not one, but all of us off at once. Although I can not speak for the
others
experience of the “super” as the Frenchmen termed our ride, I came up out
of
the water seeing stars and a few bruises here and there. However, I
assume
that since Vanessa decided to call it quits after the “super” she had a
little too much fun.

Because Kari and I were a bit disappointed by the fact we did not get to
enjoy more “supers,” we made up for it by going para-sailing. After
getting hooked up to the parachute, the boat took off and within seconds
we
were “up, up and away,” overlooking the Mediterranean sea and the coast
of
South France which included numerous little white houses and stores as
well
as churches high up on the hilltops. Every so often our boat driver would
dip our lower torsos down into the water, just long enough for the salt
water to get in your mouth and then make us fly back up to 70 feet or so
up
in the air. On the contrary to tubing, it was so peaceful we could have
done it for hours.

After I plopped back down into the ocean to end our para-sailing ride, I
stayed on the beach for another hour or so, baking in the sun and eating
my
ice cream cone. Finally, it was time to take the sun burned body in for
a
couple of hours and clean up for dinner.

We walked a quarter of a mile or so to the restaurant, Le Cocodile, which
was across the street from the beach. To my surprise, the highlight of
dinner was watching our waiter cook Nikki (Whiting) and I fish in front
of
everyone by lighting it on fire right next to our table. She ordered the
sea
bass while I got Turbot, both of which I have never seen cooked that way
before. Dinner was delicious, and although we could barely move by the
time
we finished our banana splits with “real ice cream” (which is quite
different from my regular 96% fat free TCBY) some of us managed to walk
around the city a little bit. There were many people out walking around
as
if it were a Saturday afternoon. The shops were open, people were eating
at
cafes on the sidewalks, and artists were painting pictures trying to make
ends meet. We even saw two mimes imitating Michael Jackson to the beat of
his old tunes.

To say the least, Nice is very, very nice. However, at this point in
time,
my bed sounds even nicer. It has been a long, yet fun-filled day. I want
to conclude by saying “bonjour” to Petra, Tasheika and Shanelle and my
parents and family at home. I love you guys and can’t wait to show you
all
the pics (even though Tina, our sports information director, has taken a
picture of nearly everything and everywhere so you probably have already
seen it.) Au Revoir and Bonne Soire.

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