August 18, 2010 - by
Noles To Play In US Amateur

Aug. 18, 2010




TALLAHASSEE, Fla. –
Florida State University golfers Drew Kittleson and Brooks Koepka, who helped lead the Seminoles to a third place finish at the 2010 NCAA Men’s Golf Championship, will both play in the 110th U.S. Amateur Championship at Chambers Bay in University Place, Wash., August 23-29, 2010. Kittleson and Koepka are two of the 312 players who will vie for the championship of the second oldest golf championship in the United States.

Kittleson, who earned his way into the 2010 U.S. Amateur with his runner-up finish at the event in 2008, will play in the tournament for the fourth time in his career. He finished in second place at the U.S. Amateur in at Pinehurst in 2008 which earned him exempt status for inclusion into the 2009, 2010 and 2011 tournaments. Koepka earned his was into the tournament at a sectional qualifier at the Mayacoo Lake country Club in West Palm Beach, Fla., in West Palm Beach. He shot a two round total of four under par 140 on August 9-10 to qualify to play in the tournament for the first time in his career.

Koepka and Kittleson were both named to the PING All-American by the Golf Coaches Association of America in 2010. Koepka was a Third Team and Kittleson was an Honorable Mention selection.

“I’m really looking forward to playing in the biggest amateur tournament in the world,” said Kittleson. “It’s the tournament that my whole summer comes down too. Hopefully I can improve on my second place finish two years ago and bring a trophy back to Tallahassee.”

Kittleson finished as the runner-up to Danny Lee at the 2008 U.S. Amateur which qualified him to play in both the 2009 Master’s Championship and 2009 U.S. Open. Despite missing the cut in both events, Kittleson recorded two eagles during the second round of the Master’s and played a practice round with Phil Mickelson and played with 1987 Master’s Champion Larry Mize in the first round of the event.

Koepka, who was named the ACC Player of the Year in 2010 (an award which he shared with Virginia’s Ben Kohles), ranked fourth in the ACC with a career-low 71.91 stroke average as a sophomore. He is one of only two players in Florida State history to earn ACC Player of the Year honors and is one of only seven players in ACC history to earn All-ACC Player of the Year and Rookie of the Year honors during his career.

The tournament begins August 23 with two rounds of stroke play followed by six rounds of match play to determine the champion. The tournament begins with 312 players with the top 64 based on stroke play advancing to match play.

Related Articles